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    Data

    Data drives improvement, yet the American health care system operates with limited data. States can use data to assess quality and outcomes and to monitor population health, and publicly report data to engage the public. Effective data use requires a commitment to data collection, a strategy to combine data from different sources, selection of priority areas for analysis, and reporting to track and drive improvement. The ACA calls for enhanced collection and reporting of data elements such as race, ethnicity, language, price, utilization, program enrollment, and quality metrics as well as consumer complaints, wellness programs, the prevalence of chronic diseases, and the health care workforce.

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    Anne Gauthier
    District of Columbia
    New NASHP resource on data for state payment and delivery reform
    Did you attend the “Payment and Delivery System Reform: It’s All About the Data, States!” webinar on July 30? As promised, we would like to give you the opportunity to carry on the conversation begun during that webinar. Some key questions posed by... read more

    Did you attend the “Payment and Delivery System Reform: It’s All About the Data, States!” webinar on July 30? As promised, we would like to give you the opportunity to carry on the conversation begun during that webinar. Some key questions posed by attendees that we didn’t have time to cover during the webinar include:

    - How have states with All Payer Claims Databases used or analyzed the data for quality improvement?
    - How do we collect data about populations with complex needs (e.g. dual eligible) and how do we develop tools that can accurately capture information about them?
    - What mechanisms are in place in states to encourage or support cross-department communications for sharing data?

    Do you have questions or answers? Post them here!

    As a reminder, you can review the slides or recording at: http://www.nashp.org/webinar/payment-and-delivery-system-reform-its-all-...

    replyAugust 1st, '13
    New State-Level Data Source To Monitor Insurance Markets at the Plan Level
    A new SHADAC Issue Brief highlights a data source that state might find useful for monitoring their insurance markets or comparing their markets to other states. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) has begun to collect and publish... read more

    A new SHADAC Issue Brief highlights a data source that state might find useful for monitoring their insurance markets or comparing their markets to other states. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) has begun to collect and publish health-plan level data from each state from insurers that sell health insurance policies within the individual and fully-insured small and large group markets. The NAIC Supplemental Health Care Exhibits are currently available for years 2011-2012 and includes detailed information from each insurer on the following:
    • Number of covered lives
    • Number of policies
    • Member months
    • Health premiums earned
    • Federal taxes
    • State taxes
    • Premium and other taxes
    • Incurred claims
    • Incurred expenses for improving health care quality
    • Claims adjustment expenses, general expenses and administrative expenses

    Data Needs and Requirements Related to State-Based Marketplaces (SBMs)
    SHADAC and the State Network recently hosted a small group meeting with staff from 9 states to discuss the data needs and requirements related to State-Based Marketplaces (SBMs). In preparation for the meeting and as follow-up, we collected a variety... read more

    SHADAC and the State Network recently hosted a small group meeting with staff from 9 states to discuss the data needs and requirements related to State-Based Marketplaces (SBMs). In preparation for the meeting and as follow-up, we collected a variety of really great resources and examples that we posted here: http://www.shadac.org/sbmdataneeds

    Resources include summaries, state planning documents and federal guidance related to exchange evaluation, federal reporting, operational decision-making and quality monitoring.

    call center volume

    has any states done a forecast of how many phone calls, or other contacts, that they plan to recieve in the first year of operation?

    replyJan 2nd, '13
    Re: call center volume

    I'm pretty sure I saw some stuff from CA. They have some similar programs so are somewhat far along on this. I can't put my hands on their info though but may be able to search their website.

    Jan 2nd, '13
    Rachel Dolan
    District of Columbia
    Re: call center volume
    Hi Michael- We do have some data from VT in this presentation: http://dvha.vermont.gov/administration/call-center-assessment-presentati... We'd love to hear from other states if they've done any modeling on this issue. read more

    Hi Michael- We do have some data from VT in this presentation: http://dvha.vermont.gov/administration/call-center-assessment-presentati...
    We'd love to hear from other states if they've done any modeling on this issue.

    Jan 3rd, '13
    State Refor(u)m
    District of Columbia
    Health Affairs: Public Cost Reporting
    Effective public reporting on provider costs might help slow the rate of growth of US health care spending, write Ateev Mehrota and colleagues in this April 2012 Health Affairs article. The authors have put forward an important set of recommendations... read more

    Effective public reporting on provider costs might help slow the rate of growth of US health care spending, write Ateev Mehrota and colleagues in this April 2012 Health Affairs article. The authors have put forward an important set of recommendations for maximizing the impact of cost reporting. Pointing out that many cost reports on the market today are of limited use, they suggest that cost reports should be:

    • Aligned with financial incentives that encourage the use of high-value providers;
    • Applicable to a consumer given his or her insurance benefit design; and
    • Designed to deliver information on key provider quality metrics.

    If you only have a minute, check out Exhibit 2 (shown on page 846) for an illustrative example of the sort of cost report that the authors propose.

    Read the full text below. And tell us:

    • Do you agree with Mehrota et al.’s recommendations? What components do you think are most critical?
    • Is cost reporting a component of your state’s strategy to drive quality and efficiency? If so, are you considering options to promote public cost reporting through the exchange? What other levers are you considering to spread cost reporting?

    replyMay 3rd, '12